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30DSHS- Make Three New Friends Each Day

by Steve Scott | Join Him On Facebook

It’s time for the 5th installment of the 30 Day Success Habits Series. (A monthly column where I discuss the habits that I’m trying to develop for the next 30 days)

For the month of May, I’m going to do something that will really push my comfort zone. It’s something that I’ve done in a past, but got out of the habit in the last few years.

But before we get to the habit, let me first explain what’s currently going on in my life…

…The Challenge

To be honest, it’s not the easiest thing to be a solo traveler. There are many sites and experiences that would be better shared with other people. So while it’s fun to plan my trip exactly the way I want it to go, I feel like I would be having a lot more fun if I had some friends with me.

Now here’s where things get a little interesting. I’m currently in Spain where not many people speak English and my Spanish is pretty horrendous. As a result, I’ve found it hard to really communicate with everyone around me.

But with all that said, here’s the habit I’m trying to create:

The Habit…Make Three New Friends Each Day


This is going to be a very straight-forward challenge. Each and every day, I’m going to approach three strangers with the intention of trying to create a friendship. While I know that it’s not possible to make three lifelong friends each day, I want to develop the habit (again) of starting conversations with those around me.

Now to make this work, I’ll have to ditch my habit of staying only in hotels and spend some time in hostels where there is more of community vibe to the people staying there. While I like my personal space and I’m not really into younger, party scene, I do think hostels will be an invaluable resource for making connections.

Another strategy is I’m using is to strike up conversations with people I encounter as I visit sites and move throughout the day. And even though my Spanish is awful, I’ve already been able to strike up a conversation with a simple “Tu Hablas Ingles?” and then ask a simple question if they speak a little English. Some of the questions I’m asking:

  • What is fun to do around here?
  • What places have you traveled to?
  • Do you have any suggestions for what I should see?
  • What’s a good place to eat? (or where to get Tapas, see a Flamenco show, etc.)
  • Viene áqui mucho? (Do you come here often?)

Okay, that last one was a joke.

The point of this exercise is to start connecting with the people around me. Sure, I might already know the answers to most of the questions I’ll ask. What I’m trying to achieve is to develop the habit where I can quickly form friendship with strangers.

Wish me luck!

Take Action. Get Results.



{ 8 comments }

Andres

Hi! I hope you enjoy Spain. I live in Saragossa. Contact me if you plan to visit this city and I’ll show you good places to eat tapas. Keep writing too! Good work with the blog!

Steve Scott

Thanks Andres! Unfortunately I’m not going to make it to Saragossa. But I appreciate the offer… also, thanks for the comment. Don’t be a stranger!

Mauricio

Steve,

Love your blog. I have gotten a lot of inspiring, useful, and above all Practical information. I know this is slightly off topic but what products do you promote for your affiliates?

Thanks

Steve Scott

Thanks Mauricio. Unfortunately for now, I’m keeping not going to really get into the exact niche that I’m in. But I know for this site, I’m starting to promote products that have helped me build an affiliate marketing business.

Ralph

And how is it working for you? It’s a good plan but I know that I would hate it. I did make friends when I spent two months in Europe and stayed in hostels but I don’t think I could do it now.
.-= Ralph´s last blog ..In 1995 I learned how much being an employee sucks! =-.

Steve Scott

It’s working pretty well so far. I do a feel a little beyond the whole “backpacker” scene, but it’s been a blast so far.

David Black

Remember, you don’t have to only make friends with the locals. Fellow travellers will be more than happy for some company and conversation too. From my (admittedly limited) time spent travelling Europe, I found that most people speak English, especially Germans, Belgians and Dutch from my experience. English is pretty much taught in schools to a conversational level of fluency, so don’t be afraid to just ‘wing it’. Even if they don’t understand you, much amusement and bonding can happen from conveying what you mean with a combination of hand gestures and diagrams. Travelling is as much about the people you encounter, as the places you go, so go for it and have a blast man.
.-= David Black´s last blog ..What To Do If You Don’t Know What To Say! =-.

Steve Scott

Definitely agree with you on all these points. It’s been a cool experience meeting people from all over the world. I’ve found that a lot my fellow travelers share a lot of the same mindset and general philosophy.

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